Few workers today are angling for the top spot, according to a survey by OfficeTeam. More than three-quarters (76%) of employees polled said they have no interest in having their manager's position. And nearly two-thirds (65%) believe they couldn't do a better job than their boss.

More than 400 workers 18 years of age or older and employed in office environments, were asked: "Would you like to have your manager's job?"

Their responses:

  • No: 76%
  • Yes: 21%
  • Don't know: no answer 3%

Workers also were asked: "Do you think you could do a better job than your boss?"

Their responses:

  • No: 65%
  • Yes: 28%
  • Don't know/no answer: 7%

The survey also revealed that more workers between the ages of 18 and 34 wanted their manager's position (35%) than in other age groups.

Many aspects of management involve making difficult, sometimes unpopular decisions, and not everyone is comfortable in this role, says OfficeTeam. Being a strong individual contributor does not necessarily equate to being an effective leader.

OfficeTeam identified seven traits potential leaders possess:

  • Integrity. The best managers foster trust among employees by placing ethics first.
  • Sound judgment. Top supervisors can be counted on to make tough decisions based on logic and rationale.
  • Diplomacy. Handling challenging situations with tact and discretion is a must. Effective managers don't take all the credit for results: they consistently acknowledge individual and team contributions.
  • Adaptability. It's essential that leaders be able to think on their feet. They should be innovative while also encouraging team members to develop creative solutions.
  • Strong communication. To motivate and guide employees, influential managers freely share their vision with others.
  • Good listening skills. Successful bosses realize they don't have all the answers and seek input from colleagues.
  • Influence. Great managers build strong networks within the organization to gain support for their ideas.