Gov. Ned Lamont signed much-needed legislation Aug. 2 that cuts licensing and certification red tape for those relocating to Connecticut, including spouses of military personnel.

HB 6449 allows individuals who are relocating to the state and spouses of active duty members of the armed forces to apply for state licenses if they meet the following criteria: 

  • Holds a valid license, permit, certification or registration in at least one other jurisdiction in the U.S.
  • Practiced under such license, permit, certification or registration for not less than four years
  • Is in good standing in all jurisdictions in the U.S.
  • Satisfies any background check or character and fitness check required of other applicants
  • Pays all fees required of other applicants 

Some applicants may need to take and pass all or a portion of any examination required of other persons applying for that license, permit, certification, or registration.

Professions

The types of professions impacted by the new law—effective Oct. 1, 2021—include accountants, architects, interior designers, pharmacy technicians, locksmiths, nurses, physicians, emergency medical services personnel, and home inspectors.  

CBIA applauds the legislature and the administration for addressing the licensing and certification issue, which was one of the organization's key 2021 Rebuilding Connecticut policy priorities.

"This bill helps increase the eligible workforce—addressing skills shortages across a number of industries—and encourages future continued migration into our state," said CBIA's Ashley Zane.

Military spouses are 10 times more likely than their civilian counterparts to have moved across state lines in the last year.

Zane noted the legislation's importance for military families, citing Connecticut Office of Military Affairs data showing that 90% of military spouses are female with approximately one third of those working in licensed fields.

Military spouses are also 10 times more likely than their civilian counterparts to have moved across state lines in the last year. Even before the pandemic, they faced a 16% unemployment rate—double the state jobless rate.

"This bill takes a significant step toward reducing workforce inequality and increasing Connecticut’s competitive ability to attract highly skilled workers," she said.

'Balance'

Lamont said the law encourages skilled workers to call Connecticut home, striking a balance between ensuring high quality standards and streamlining the licensure process.

"For the first time in a generation, tens of thousands of young families are moving to our state," he said. "This law helps them contribute their skills to our communities."

Connecticut is one of only eight states that has not joined any interstate licensure compact.

The law also requires the state Department of Public Health to create a working group to examine whether Connecticut should join any interstate licensure compacts to make the licensing process even easier.

Connecticut is one of only eight states that has not joined any interstate licensure compact. The department must report its recommendations by Jan. 15, 2022.


For more information, contact CBIA's Ashley Zane (860.244.1169) | @AshleyZane9