State Department of Revenue Services commissioner Mark Boughton will oversee how Connecticut allocates $5.38 billion in federal infrastructure funds.

Gov. Ned Lamont named the former Danbury mayor his senior advisor for infrastructure Dec. 16 to coordinate multi-agency approaches to administering funds from the Infrastructure Investment and Jobs Act.

"Commissioner Boughton will be a critical member of the team ensuring that our investments are coordinated, strategic, and equitable," Lamont said in a statement.

"Boughton knows how local government works and he knows how state government works, providing a unique and necessary perspective that I know will be successful."

Boughton said his experience in local and state government will help him work with “colleagues and other stakeholders across the state to address infrastructure needs, create good quality jobs, and position Connecticut to make the most of this historic allocation of funds.”

More than $1 trillion is dedicated to reinvigorating the country’s infrastructure, including investments in repairing roads and bridges, public transportation, and enhanced electric vehicle funding.

Funding

Connecticut's share of the funding will be allocated over five years to projects that include:

  • $3.29 billion to repair roads, accelerate projects, and reduce traffic congestion
  • $1.3 billion to enhance public transportation
  • $561 million to repair the state’s aging bridges
  • $100 million for broadband coverage
  • $53 million for electric vehicle charging networks

Connecticut will also be positioned to compete with Northeast Corridor states for up to $30 billion in grants and the rest of the country for up to $100 billion in grants.

CBIA's Wyatt Bosworth called Boughton's appointment "welcome news."

“It's crucial that state government works collaboratively and efficiently to ensure federal infrastructure dollars are appropriated efficiently and expeditiously so we can rebuild our state's roads and bridges, and get people to work," he said.

Filed Under: State Spending, Transportation

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