The General Assembly made good strides this session in working to improve Connecticut's regulatory climate.

Bills were passed to ensure regular review of the need and efficacy of existing regulations, as well as requiring a better understanding of the potential impact of proposed regulations on small businesses.

Under SB 302, state agencies, policymakers, and the public will gain a better understanding of how proposed regulations—before they receive final approval—will impact small businesses.

When proposing regulations, agencies must answer a variety of questions concerning the types of businesses (with fewer than 250 employees) that will be impacted, and how.

This is how Massachusetts and Rhode Island already do it, so Connecticut will join them in this regulatory transparency.

By allowing HB 5500 to die, the Senate missed an opportunity to send a positive signal to businesses considering moving to Connecticut.
By allowing HB 5500 to die on its calendar, the Senate missed an opportunity to send a positive signal to businesses considering moving to Connecticut.

The bill would have given state agencies the authority to waive penalties for first-time violations of regulations that were fully corrected within 30 days.

HB 5498 creates a process for ensuring existing regulations are periodically reviewed by agencies and the legislature so that outdated, ineffective regulations or those that have been the subject of written complaints from the regulated community can be adjusted or withdrawn.

Agencies will have to report to the legislative committees that oversee their activities at least every seven years.

The committees may hold hearings and make recommendations for legislative or regulatory action.


For more information, contact CBIA's Eric Brown (860.244.1926) | @CBIAericb