In Connecticut, engineers are in high demand and short supply. CBIA and its partners are building students’ interest in engineering, expanding their knowledge of educational requirements and career opportunities in the field, and illustrating how engineering transforms and enriches the way we live.

Engineering: An Educator's Guide
Engineering: An Educator's Guide

Almost one and a half million jobs in the United States belong to engineers. About 555,000 are in manufacturing, and another 378,000 are in professional, scientific and technical services, such as architectural engineering and research and development.

Many engineers also work in construction, transportation, telecommunications, and utilities. In addition, about 800,000 jobs belong to computer software applications and systems engineers, representing about 7,000 positions in Connecticut alone.

Engineers are employed in cities and rural areas throughout the country; however, some branches of engineering are concentrated in particular geographic regions.

Which states might have a higher proportion of petroleum engineers, and why? What about agricultural engineers? Which types of engineering jobs might be more widely dispersed?

Why might Connecticut have a higher-than-average percentage of aerospace engineers?

Chemical Engineer

A typical day in the life of a young chemical engineer at Unilever.

Design Engineer

A typical day in the life of a young design engineer at a medical instrument facility.

Electrical Engineer

A typical day in the life of two electrical engineers at a large utility company.

Environmental Engineer

A typical day in the life of a young environmental engineer.

Manufacturing Engineer

A typical day in the life of two manufacturing engineers who work on the space shuttle.

Software Engineer

A typical day in the life of a young software engineer.

Structural Engineer

A typical day in the life of a young, female structural engineer.