Since the advent of the women’s movement in the 1970s, women have made great strides in achieving equality in the workplace.

Women in Manufacturing: An Educator’s Guide
Women in Manufacturing: An Educator’s Guide

Today, women in manufacturing have the same opportunities as men—whether it’s operating a complex machine, designing a product, or managing the operations of an entire company.

Yet between 2010 and 2011, according to a study by the National Women’s Law Center, men gained 230,000 jobs in manufacturing while women lost 25,000 jobs.

Today, only about 30 percent of Americans who work in manufacturing are women, and 15 percent of students enrolled in manufacturing degree programs are women.

Women can make a critical difference in an industry in dire need of qualified skilled workers -- and they have the same opportunities as men to succeed and excel in the new world of manufacturing.

  • Women in Manufacturing: Mechanical Engineer

A'arika Hawkins, a mechanical engineer with UTC Aerospace Systems, talks about her personal career pathway.

Women in Manufacturing: Operations Manager

Shelley Fasano, an operations manager with Dymotek Corporation, talks about her personal career pathway.

Women in Manufacturing: Quality Manager

Laurie Catalano, a competence center quality manager with Eppendorf, talks about her personal career pathway.

Women in Manufacturing: Research Engineer

Myrna Reyes, a a research and development engineer with TRUMPF, talks about her personal career pathway.

Women in Manufacturing: Test Technician

Shelby Baker, a test technician with Whelen Engineering, shares her personal career pathway.

Women in Manufacturing: Welder

Jessica Templeton, a welder with CAMM Metals, talks about her personal career pathway.