Thomaston Savings Bank Donates $229K to Community Groups

09.22.2021
Member News
Small Business

From helping stock the shelves in food pantries to giving kids the ability to work with a laptop, the Thomaston Savings Bank Foundation is continuing to help communities across Connecticut.

The foundation distributed almost $229,000 during the second phase of its 2021 grant cycle.

The funding was shared among 111 organizations in Litchfield County as part of the annual program.

“We are proud to contribute to a variety of non-profit organizations who are dedicated to making the community a better place,” said Thomaston Savings Bank president and CEO Stephen Lewis.

“We are grateful for the support from our community and look forward to giving back to these wonderful organizations.

Grant Recipients

Grant recipients in phase two included the American Legion Post, American Red Cross, East Litchfield Volunteer Fire Company, Five Points Center for the Visual Arts, Salvation Army, Community Kitchen of Torrington and Warner Theatre.

“The foundation, fully funded by the bank, has awarded an incredible $7.5 million since its inception,” said bank community outreach officer Cheryl Lindstrom.

The foundation, fully funded by the bank, has awarded $7.5 million since its inception.

“I consider it a privilege to represent both the bank and the foundation’s continuing work to ensure the charitable needs of our neighbors are met year after year.” 

Lindstrom said the need to help food pantries and soup kitchens persisted this year, adding that insecurities are moving beyond food. Some organizations are distributing additional items, including toiletries.

She said other grants were given to human services departments in various towns as well as schools, including Thomaston High School, to help fund the purchase of laptops for students.

Business Philosophy

Since 1997, the foundation has given away funds annually to help charitable organizations in towns the bank calls home. It is part of their business philosophy to build lasting relationships in the community.

Typically, organizations in areas served by the bank applied at one time. During the pandemic, the foundation broke the grant process down into phases so organizations most impacted by COVID-19 could get grant money immediately.

The foundation has given away funds annually in towns the bank calls home since 1997.

The second phase was for organizations whose fundraising efforts took a hit during the pandemic.

This year, the foundation broke the grant process down by location.

Organizations in Hartford County received grants in phase one and the foundation awarded grants to non-profit organizations in Litchfield County in phase two.  

New Haven County organizations fall in phase three, with applications opening in October. 

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