Committee Wants to Add to HR Workload

03.04.2010
Issues & Policies

As if human resources professionals in Connecticut don’t already have enough work to do, two proposals in the Labor Committee would drop new administrative tasks and burdens onto their desks.

CBIA testified this week against the proposals which also would weaken Connecticut’s prospects for more job-creation with added costs.

Reason for termination

Under SB-169, employers would face a $300 fine if they fail to specify a reason, in writing, for terminating their employees. In addition to adding more red tape, the proposal undercuts the basic principle of at-will employment which allows parties to break an employment relationship at any time and for any reason, or no reason at all.

Many employers in the state already provide employees with a reason for termination. Connecticut unemployment law requires employers to provide separating employees with a notice of the potential availability of unemployment compensation benefits, and that form indicates the reason for separation.

Sometimes, a neutral reason such as “failure to meet job requirements” is indicated, in order not to stand in the way of the employee’s eligibility for unemployment benefits—or to keep company information confidential.

Being forced to specify a reason could hurt both the terminated employee and the company if information that should be confidential is disclosed.

SB-169 is unnecessary and another government mandate on employers at a time when many need to have the utmost flexibility in managing their workplaces.

E-verify

SB-240 requires that after Jan. 1, 2011, any employer who employs 50 or more employees must register with and utilize the federal E-Verify system to verify the work eligibility status of each newly hired employee. E-Verify is an Internet-based system administered by the federal government to determine if an employee is eligible to work in the country.    

However, the system has been riddled with problems since it began. Specifically, the E-Verify system has been plagued with problems such as

  • Data information errors
  • Computer system malfunctions
  • Erroneously reported Social Security information
  • Failure to detect fraudulent information on I-9 forms

A study completed in December 2009 found the E-Verify system wrongly cleared illegal workers about 54% of the time. As a result of that study, key members of Congress have stated publicly that it doesn’t make sense to expand and invest in E-Verify without first addressing the many problems that affect the system.

CBIA agrees and urges lawmakers to reject SB-240. For a complete listing of labor-related measures CBIA is watching this year, see “CBIA’s Legislative Status Report.”

For more information, contact Kia Murrell at 860.244.1931 or kia.murrell@cbia.com.

Tags:

Leave a Reply

Your email address will not be published.

Stay Connected with CBIA News Digests

The latest news and information delivered directly to your inbox.

CBIA IS FIGHTING TO MAKE CONNECTICUT A TOP STATE FOR BUSINESS, JOBS, AND ECONOMIC GROWTH. A BETTER BUSINESS CLIMATE MEANS A BRIGHTER FUTURE FOR EVERYONE.