A 24/7 Wall St. report released on Aug. 10 pegged Connecticut as one of the toughest states in which to land a full-time job.

That's partially true.

When it comes to low-skill or unskilled labor, fewer job opportunities exist here than down south or in the middle states.

And our state’s high minimum wage compels Connecticut companies to use automation here more than their competitors do.

But that doesn't mean there are not a lot of job openings statewide.

Indeed, a recent CBIA survey showed 60% of Connecticut’s small businesses have hired or expect to hire in 2016, and 15% of them are hiring more than 10 workers this year.

Manufacturers are consistently among the hardest-pressed to fill high-skill, high-tech, high-wage jobs.

The economy has changed, and companies need people with key skills who can be productive from day one.
The economy has changed, and companies need people with key skills who can be productive from day one.

Rather than clamoring for a $15 minimum wage, we might be better served by efforts to reduce the school dropout rate, train young people in high-demand jobs, and retrain displaced workers for technical and skilled careers.

That would help obviate need to "fight for fifteen.”

Those jobs already pay much more.


Pete Gioia is an economist with CBIA. Follow him on Twitter @CTEconomist.