A new toolkit from the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention is designed to help employers build confidence in COVID-19 vaccines among essential employers.

The toolkit's release reflects the availability, or pending availability of the vaccine, for essential workers across the country.

In Connecticut, essential workers are included in the state's Phase 1b vaccine rollout, with vaccinations expected to begin in March.

This toolkit will help your organization educate employees about COVID-19 vaccines, raise awareness about the benefits of vaccination, and address common questions and concerns,” the CDC said.

Essential workers perform duties across critical sectors and maintain services and functions that Americans depend on every day.

They include police officers, firefighters, and people who work in education, child care centers, and grocery stores.

Resources

Among the toolkit’s resources:

  • Key messages
  • An educational slide deck
  • FAQ
  • Posters/flyers
  • Newsletter content
  • A vaccine fact sheet available in several languages
  • A template letter for employees
  • Social media content
  • Vaccination sticker templates

Key Messages

The CDC is encouraging employers to adapt the toolkit’s key messages to the language, tone, and format that will resonate with their specific organization or industry.

The agency says it’s important for employers to inform their employees about the value of vaccination.

It's important that employers inform employees about the value of vaccination.

It suggests emailing workers to introduce your company’s COVID-19 educational activities, organizing a vaccine presentation for employees using information and downloads from the toolkit, and continuing to educate employees via social media posts and blogs, if your company has one.

“Accurate COVID-19 vaccine information is critical,” the CDC said in urging employers to share information on myths and facts about the vaccine with their employees.


For more information, contact CBIA’s Phillip Montgomery (860.244.1982).